Posts tagged “regional”

ChittahChattah Quickies

  • Nollywood success puts Nigeria’s film industry in regional spotlight [Times Online] – Nollywood began about 20 years ago with the birth of home video cameras, and is now a movie-making machine that churns out about 600 titles a year. Unesco, the UN cultural organisation, said last year that Nollywood was now the second-biggest film industry in the world in terms of output, after Bollywood in India. It called for greater support to nurture the industry so that it can exploit the huge market that it has uncovered. It is now also the country’s second-largest employer, after the federal Government, though figures vary enormously depending on what is being shot at the time. The films can take about a month to complete and cost no more than £19,000 to make. On the streets they sell for about £1.50 a copy. About 20 titles used to emerge every week, selling thousands of copies. The industry is now said to be worth upwards of £100 million a year.

ChittahChattah Quickies

  • Remixing Deep Dive Interviewing Secrets [Things On Top] – This remix of tweets from “Deep Dive Interviewing Secrets”, a UIE virtual seminar by Steve Portigal, gives you some of the answers. I missed out on Steve’s webinar, unfortunately, and decided to check out what others had tweeted about it using the hashtag #uievs. Luckily, there had been lots of activity and discussion, and I felt that Twitter provided me with quite a comprehensive summary of Steve’s stunning insights in to interview techniques. For my own sake and for future reference, I decided to compile that Twitter timeline in to a short document.
  • Remembrance of Candy Bars Past [] – These companies are the face of what the candy industry in America used to be. Each city or region had its own factories, and people could actually see and smell the place where their favorite sweets were made. Regional candies are a dying breed. Today, there are perhaps a dozen such concerns left in America. The rest have been swallowed up, or put out of business, by the massive consolidation that has shaped the modern confectionery industry. Thousands of candy bars have disappeared along the road to consolidation, including such recent delicacies as the peanut butter-and-chocolate pods known as Oompahs, the treacherously chewy Bit-o-Choc, the glorious, nougat-and-caramel-filled Milkshake, and the Bar None, an ingenious marriage of peanuts and wafers dipped in chocolate. Also gone (but not forgotten) is the curiously alluring Marathon Bar, a braided rope of chocolate and caramel whose wrapper featured a ruler on the back.


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