Posts tagged “emerging”

ChittahChattah Quickies

  • Devising the stove that could save the world [The New Yorker] – The effort to develop a better stove (safer, healthier, uses less fuel) for developing nations, and the challenges in getting that solution adopted once it's development is funded and the engineering problems are solved.
  • What means to find out what your customers want – The idea behind the centers is to foster innovation by combining a richer understanding of customer needs with creative links among 3M technologies. “Being customer-driven doesn’t mean asking customers what they want and then giving it to them,” says Ranjay Gulati, a professor at the Harvard Business School. “It’s about building a deep awareness of how the customer uses your product.”

ChittahChattah Quickies

  • Sterling Brands supports RoomtoRead – In 2008, after the successfully funding the construction of two, brandnew school libraries in Nepal and Cambodia, Sterling Brands made the decision to ally itself once more with RoomtoRead and give the gift of reading to a school of nearly 600 students in rural South Africa.

    We are happy to announce that this summer, we received a completion report on our latest project with RoomtoRead, which provided for a refurbished library, a full-stock of both English and native-language books, and training for the library staff at the Kennen Primary School. The school is in the tiny rural village of Violatbank G, in the province of Mpumalanga in eastern South Africa, which borders on Swaziland and Mozambique.

Primping for the Cameras in the Name of Research

Cosmetics companies are striving to understand how their products are used differently in their various emerging markets. Presumably, they are elsewhere looking at differences in meaning, in addition to simply understanding usage.

Crucial to that effort is the search for differences that could help build a brand in critical emerging markets like India and China. L’Oreal has an expanding network of 13 evaluation centers around the world created to observe grooming and ponder a variety of burning questions: Do national differences exist in primping styles? Would women in Japan and Europe, for instance, stroke on mascara with the same lavish hand? (The answer is that in Japan, women apply mascara with an average of 100 brush strokes compared with Europeans, who are satisfied with 50, a difference noted by ethnologists for L’Oreal.)

It was observations like these that ultimately affected how the company made and marketed its mascaras or developed the foaming quality of its shampoos. “We are far from understanding everybody everywhere. It takes time,” said Fabrice Aghassian, director of international product evaluation for L’Oreal, which is seeking to map the world’s beauty routines in a landscape the company calls geocosmetics. “When we know the behaviors of people, we know what unexpressed expectations we do have to consider.”


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